Arguing the Case for Sound (A Sound Argument!)

Thinking about all the ways that sound plays into our experience... 

These pictures are from the app "Frequency", one of my favorites. I use it to measure the tones of Himalayan singing bowls. What I love, of course, is that it shows the sound waves.

I love all the different ways we can think about sound- the word, the meaning, the experience. Ideas and people resonate with us- or not! A word, a phrase, a title, an image, rings a bell. I especially like the idea of sound as an adjective that implies stability and strength- such as a sound building... or a sound argument.

Stop, hey, what's that sound?

I don't know. I didn't hear it. I was sound asleep!

"Sound" can be used as a noun, a verb or an adjective. The following is from

sound 1

a. Vibrations transmitted through an elastic solid or a liquid or gas, with frequencies in the approximate range of 20 to 20,000 hertz, capable of being detected by human organs of hearing.
b. Transmitted vibrations of any frequency.
c. The sensation stimulated in the organs of hearing by such vibrations in the air or other medium.
d. Such sensations considered as a group.
2. A distinctive noise: a hollow sound.
3. The distance over which something can be heard: within sound of my voice.
4. Linguistics
a. An articulation made by the vocal apparatus: a vowel sound.
b. The distinctive character of such an articulation: The words bear and bare have the same sound.
5. A mental impression; an implication: didn't like the sound of the invitation.
6. Auditory material that is recorded, as for a movie.
7. Meaningless noise.
8. Music A distinctive style, as of an orchestra or singer.
9. Archaic Rumor; report.
v. sound·ed, sound·ing, sounds
a. To make or give forth a sound: The siren sounded.
b. To be given forth as a sound: The fanfare sounded.
2. To present a particular impression: That argument sounds reasonable.
1. To cause to give forth or produce a sound: sounded the gong.
2. To summon, announce, or signal by a sound: sound a warning.
3. Linguistics To articulate; pronounce: sound a vowel.
4. To make known; celebrate: "Nations unborn your mighty names shall sound" (Alexander Pope).
5. To examine (a body organ or part) by causing to emit sound; auscultate.
Phrasal Verb:
sound off
1. To express one's views vigorously: was always sounding off about higher taxes.
2. To count cadence when marching in military formation.

[Middle English soun, from Old French son, from Latin sonus; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

sound 2

adj. sound·er, sound·est
1. Free from defect, decay, or damage; in good condition: Is the bridge sound?
2. Free from disease or injury. See Synonyms at healthy.
a. Marked by or showing common sense and good judgment; levelheaded: a sound approach to the problem.
b. Based on valid reasoning; having no logical flaws: a sound conclusion; sound reasoning. See Synonyms at valid.
c. Logic Of or relating to an argument in which all the premises are true and the conclusion follows from the premises.
a. Secure or stable: a partnership that started on a sound footing.
b. Financially secure or safe: a sound economy.
5. Thorough; complete: gave their rivals a sound thrashing.
6. Deep and unbroken; undisturbed: a sound sleep.
7. Compatible with an accepted point of view; orthodox: sound doctrine.
Thoroughly; deeply: sound asleep.

[Middle English, from Old English gesund.]

sound′ly adv.
sound′ness n.

sound 3

1. Abbr. Sd.
a. A long, relatively wide body of water, larger than a strait or a channel, connecting larger bodies of water.
b. A long, wide ocean inlet.
2. Archaic The swim bladder of a fish.

[Middle English, from Old English sund, swimming, sea.]

sound 4

v. sound·ed, sound·ing, sounds
1. To measure the depth of (water), especially by means of a weighted line; fathom.
2. To try to learn the attitudes or opinions of: sounded out her feelings.
3. To probe (a body cavity) with a sound.
1. To measure depth.
2. To dive swiftly downward. Used of a marine mammal or a fish.
3. To look into a possibility; investigate.
An instrument used to examine or explore body cavities, as for foreign bodies or other abnormalities, or to dilate strictures in them.

[Middle English sounden, from Old French sonder, from sonde, sounding line, probably of Germanic origin.]